10 Things You Need to Know in Moving to Another Country

Moving to Another Country

Written by Bernadine Racoma

February 10, 2021

Moving and living in another country presents many challenges as well as benefits. However, it can be quite a difficult undertaking, considering the number of things you have to do and learn. The experience will be completely different. It is not the same as visiting a country as a tourist. Moving to another country bears the stamp of permanency.

10 things you need to know in moving to another country

Aside from preparing the documents you need to support your immigration application, you need to know several other things, and even need to learn some.

  1. Learn about your destination
    You should know as much as you can about the country and the state or locality where you intend to relocate. The more you know, the better prepared you will be.
  2. Money
    You have to think about supporting yourself. You should have sufficient passive income or savings to support yourself and the people coming with you until you are properly employed unless your move to another country is work-related.
  3. Passport and visas
    Learn about the guidelines regarding passport validity requirements. Ensure that you are moving abroad legally and that you obtain your visa from the authorized agencies.
  4. Language
    Do you speak the language of the country you are moving to? You may have to take language lessons before you move so you can pass the language proficiency test. It’s vital to learn the basics, such as official language and local language, which may differ.
  5. Health
    You will not have medical insurance upon arrival. If you take medication, you should fill up your prescription and make sure that you have the original prescription issued by your doctor. Likewise, discuss your move with your doctor, since some of your medication may not be available in another country.
  6. Travel insurance
    Invest in travel insurance that will cover your possessions, temporary accommodation bookings, and health/medical emergencies.
  7. Sell some of what you own
    Sell some of your possessions before you leave, but after approval of your immigration and receipt of your visa.
  8. Cost of moving
    Moving to another country is very expensive. Think of the things that you should bring or allowed to bring, and transporting them.
  9. Bank accounts
    Opening a bank account in another country is not easy. Check if the bank you use has an international branch so you can continue the service, until such time that you can open a new bank account in your new location.
  10. Culture and religion
    Learn as much as you can about local culture and religious practices.

What are the top common problems in moving to another country?

Expect to encounter many challenges when you first arrive at your new location. Some issues you are like to face are the following:

  • Language barrier. The language barrier is the most common problem when you move to another country. It is better to learn the language before you move. For starters, you should at least know some basic words and phrases to get by.
  • Culture shock. This is inevitable since the culture in the new country will be very different from your culture.
  • Fitting in. You will be immersed in a new environment, culture, and workplace. And you will be challenged on how to fit in. Make sure that you quickly learn the new customs and traditions. Learn as much as you can about your new hometown so you can quickly adjust to the new neighborhood and community.
  • You cannot help but worry about your finances. You need to find a house and a job. The exchange rate will be different so your saving and even your passive income, may not be worth that much, and even last that long since you will be paying for things using local currency.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of living on your own in a different country?

Living on your own in a new country may be exciting at first, but the excitement can soon wear off if you are not careful. While on your own, you’re free to do what you want and be free of some family responsibilities. You are responsible only for yourself.

Your standard of living may improve and you’ll have a change in lifestyle, as you experience a different culture and new work environment. However, things will be different from what you are used to. It can take time to make new friends, and longer to establish trust. So, in times of need, you are on your own.

But living alone means you do not have company. You will be geographically separated from family, friends, colleagues, and other people you know. You will spend less because you are fending for yourself, and if you’re conscientious, your personal savings will improve.

You can access unlimited entertainment, live without following rules, and set your own schedule. But you might soon realize that living on your own can be boring since you cannot share your excitement, your sadness, and other things with people who care about you and willing to listen to you.

How do I translate my personal and legal documents for immigration?

When you want to immigrate, you should follow the rules of the destination country. Immigration is a complicated process and even small errors can jeopardize your application. Most immigration agencies require certified translations. Rather than risk denial, use a professional translator or a translation agency to translate your legal and personal documents.

Are you migrating? eTs can help you with certified translations

eTranslation Services has trained staff who can provide you with high-quality certified translations of all the non-English supporting documents for your immigration application. Our certified translators will have your documents not written in English translated accurately, conforming to the guidelines and requirements of the USCIS. You can contact us by sending an email to [email protected] or calling us at (800) 882-6058 as soon as you can to discuss what you need.

 

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